Not long ago we published a blog post and infographic describing how electricity has become an increasingly important part of the infrastructure for modern bricks-and-mortar schools. From high-tech instructional equipment to basic utilities like heating and lighting, school buildings rely on electric power to create productive learning environments. 

But not all of us ride bikes and busses to school – today, many students simply log on from home... 

A few weeks ago as I was gearing up for trick or treaters, many Halloween displays had already been replaced by Christmas blitz. Black Friday has been replaced by Black Thursday—what we more traditionalists like to call Thanksgiving. Cyber Monday has joined the fray.

By Shawn Taylor

Electric cooperatives are disappointed—but not surprised—that in September the Administration officially abandoned an all-of-the-above energy strategy for a new, all-but-one approach that effectively removes coal from the nation’s future fuel mix.

The policy, proposed by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), sets stringent limits on carbon dioxide emissions from future coal or natural gas plants. The problem is that the new standards are impossible to meet with existing technology.

A new game helps young students learn about the challenges and the importance of generating electricity using a variety of energy resources.

The article that follows is from a publication of the National Association of Manufacturers (NAM). It underscores the importance of affordable power to the nation's manufacturing base.

It sounds crazy. But who knows now that the EPA wants to re-categorize coal ash as hazardous waste?

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